Pompous Pumpu


Pumpu Pompous Pompa Pomponius Pomponi Pompey, Pompeii, Pompeia, Psychopomp

Pompous it is a Mystery Man of the History of Rome, in the time of Pompey the Great.

Pompous, Pumpu, Pompa, Pomponius, Pomponi, Pompeii, Pompey, Pomponii, Pomponia, Pomp

and Psychopomp ?

or Pompa or Procession:
Pompeian tomb evidence shows the munus as a civic and religious rite sponsored by a magistrate as editor. A procession (pompa) entered the arena led by the editors lictors bearing fasces to signify his power over life and death.

They were followed by a small band of tubicines playing a fanfare. Images of the gods were carried in to sanctify the pompa.

Etymology of Pompous.
Middle English, from Old French pompeux, from Latin pompa.

Gladiatorial games
A 5th century CE mosaic in the Great Palace of Constantinople depicts two venatores fighting a tiger.
Early literary sources seldom agree on the origins of gladiators and the gladiator games.[1][2] In the late 1st century BCE Nicolaus of Damascus believed they were Etruscan.[3] A generation later, Livy wrote that they were first held in 310 BCE by the Campanians in celebration of their victory over the Samnites.[4] Long after the games had ceased, the 7th century CE writer Isidore of Seville derived Latin lanista (manager of gladiators) from the Etruscan for executioner, and the title of Charon (an official who accompanied the dead from the Roman gladiatorial arena) from Charun, psychopomp of the Etruscan underworld.[5] Roman historians emphasised the gladiator games as a foreign import, most likely Etruscan. This preference informed most standard histories of the Roman games in the early modern era.

Pompeian tomb evidence shows the munus as a civic and religious rite sponsored by a magistrate as editor. A procession (pompa) entered the arena led by the editors lictors bearing fasces to signify his power over life and death. They were followed by a small band of tubicines playing a fanfare. Images of the gods were carried in to sanctify the pompa, followed by a scribe (to record the outcome) and a man carrying the palm branch used to honour victors. The editor entered among a retinue who carried the arms and armour to be used; more musicians followed then horses. The gladiators presumably came in last.[144]

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